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A FINE WAR OF 1812 AND CANADIAN REBELLION 1837 RELATED 43RD LIGHT INFANTRY ARMY LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL TO A PRIVATE CONFIRMED AS SERVING AT THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS AND CANADA 1835-8

ARMY LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT, V.R., FIRST TYPE, LARGE LETTER REVERSE ‘DAVID BUXTON, 43RD REGIMENT FOOT. 1838.’

David Buxton, aged 18 of Ipswich, Suffolk, enlisted into the 43rd Regiment of light Infantry on 5th January 1814 and remained with the 43rd as a Private until discharged on 31st May 1838 at La Prairie Lower Canada, aged 44.

His Service records note he was ‘Entitled to wear 3 distinguished badges by authority dated War Office 19th April 1837’ and that he had served at:
‘New Orleans, Army of occupation from June 1815 to October 1818, Gibraltar two years, North America from July 1835 to 31st May 1838’.

Battle of New Orleans

The 43rd light Infantry arrived in America in late December 1814. They formed part of an expeditionary force sent to take the city of New Orleans, the 43rd being Brigaded with another elite Peninsular Regiment; the 7th Fusiliers. The two Regiments landed on the 5th January 1815 and 200 of the 43rd were immediately sent to the front line to mend and guard a battery. During the battle of New Orleans itself, one Company of the 43rd, along with two of the 7th and two of the 93rd, formed a small column that would attack the crescent battery, which ultimately ended in a terrible slaughter, as indeed the entire British assault did. Although the balance of the 43rd were initially in reserve during the battle, as the British attacking columns were repulsed, 200 of the 43rd attempted to stem the tide but were themselves sent back on their heels and suffering numerous casualties. As to the company that had attacked the crescent battery, all by three of the number became casualties!

The 43rd and the Canadian rebellion of 1837

The 43rd Light Infantry was posted to Canada in 1835. The regiment under the overall command of Sir John Colborne commander-in-chief Canada, took part in the suppression of the Rebellions of 1837. In December 1837, in severe weather conditions, the regiment marched from Fredericton to Quebec a distance of 370 miles of many forests, frozen rivers and mountainous terrain in a period of eighteen days. The march received much attention in Canada and the Duke of Wellington expressed his high admiration for the arduous undertaking the 43rd had completed. The regiment left Canada for England in 1846.

Condition VF, attractive replacement bar suspension, light pawn broker’s marks to reverse. This medal is Buxton’s only medal entitlement.

A fine and scarce medal to a soldier of one of the elite units in the British Army who served in two conflicts in North America, 22 years apart!

Code J2323        Price £