medal code j2820

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A VERY SCARCE CHINA 1842 TO AN OFFICER OF THE 49TH FOOT WHO WAS TWICE WOUNDED AT THE TAKING UNDER HORRENDOUS CONDITIONS OF THE TARTAR CITY OF CHIN KIANG FOO IN JULY 1842

CHINA 1842 ‘W. H. C. BADDELEY LIEUT. 49TH REGIMENT FOOT.’

William Henry Clinton Baddeley, was born in Colchester in on 4 March 1820. The son of Captain John Baddeley of Boston, USA, he was appointed Ensign in the 49th Foot on 11 October 1839. Promoted Lieutenant on 7 September 1841, he served with the 49th Regiment in China, 1840-43 and was present at Amoy, Chusan (2nd capture), Ningpo, Segoan, Chapoo, Woosung, and the taking of the Tartar city of Chin Kiang Foo. At the latter, he was twice wounded - once dangerously by a ball which fractured his thigh-bone. Baddeley was promoted Captain, 9 June 1846, Major, 6 November 1854 and retired as a Lieutenant-Colonel on 23 May 1855. He died in Cheltenham in November 1886.

THE TAKING OF THE TARTAR CITY OF FROM THE REGIMENTAL HISTORY CHIN KIANG FU JULY 1842

“…the fleet sailed on the 6th July, up the Yantse-Kiang River to Chin Kiang Fu on its right bank, where to the general surprise, it was found that the place was apparently deserted. On the 21st July orders issued for the whole force to land at daybreak next day. The 2nd Brigade was ordered to land first at the point North East of the city, attracting the enemy’s attention in that direction, whilst General Bartley with the 3rd Brigade landed North West of the city, and Lord Saltoun, with the 1st, landed still father West. The latter was to attach the Chinese entrenched position on the hills South West of the city. With this operation which was entirely successful, we need not deal. General Schoedde, with the 2nd Brigade, landed unopposed and occupied a commanding height three hundred yards from the North East corner of the city wall. Hearing heavy firing from the direction of the 3rd Brigade, he escaladed the wall and advanced towards the Western gate where the 3rd Brigade was engaged. He was strongly opposed by Tartar troops. Meanwhile, the 3rd Brigade reinforced by the 26th from Lord Soltoun’s Brigade, had moved from its landing place through the suburbs along the canal connecting the city with the river. Arriving in front of the walls towards the Western gate, a heavy fire of musketry and artillery was brought to bear on the Tartars manning the ramparts……

SEE PDF FOR FULL WRITE UP

See the following website for an excellent summary of the China War:

https://www.britishempire.co.uk/forces/armycampaigns/asia/china/opiumwar.htm

Condition NVF, some contact wear. Fitted with contemporary silver swivel-bar suspension. Sold with copy chapter from the Regimental history on the China War. A very scarce Officer casualty medal.

Code J2820         Price £1985