medal code j2437

Full medal write up

link to medal write-up
back to previous page

A FINE AND VERY SCARCE INDIAN MUTINY AND ‘UMBEYLA’ PAIR TO A 93RD HIGHLANDERS OFFICERS WHO SAW A GREAT DEAL OF ACTION, ESPECIALLY DURING THE INDIAN MUTINY WHERE HIS REGIMENT COVERED ITSELF IN GLORY WINNING NO LESS THAN SIX VC’S AND THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW!

INDIAN MUTINY 1857-9, 2 CLASPS, RELIEF OF LUCKNOW, LUCKNOW ‘LIEUT.G. GREIG, 93RD HIGHLANDERS’, INDIA GENERAL SERVICE 1854-95, CLASP, UMBEYLA ‘LIEUT. G. GREIG, H.M. 93RD HIGHRS.’

Captain George Greig was born on 20 June 1838 and aged 16 was Commissioned Ensign, without Purchase, in the 93rd Highlanders on 9 March 1855. Soon after he embarked for the Crimea with drafts for his regiment, arriving in September 1855, just after Sebastopol was captured (therefore no medal entitlement). Promoted Lieutenant (without Purchase) on 18 January 1856, in June, the Regiment embarked for home, arriving on 15 July. Less than a year later, in June 1857, the regiment embarked for service in India, arriving in early October and immediately being involved in operations against the mutineers. During the Indian Mutiny, in which he saw a great deal of action and covered itself in glory again, not least at the during the relief of Lucknow, where on 16th November 1857, the 93rd stormed and took Secunder Baugh and Shah Nujeef fortification. For this days hard fighting, the regiment was awarded no less than 6 Victoria Crosses! During the Mutiny, Greig served in Captain Clarke’s no. 1 Company, so by following Clark and his companies service, you can follow Greig’s too. Greig’s service from the Regimental History;

‘George Greig. Ensign, 9th of March,1855 ; lieutenant, 8th of January, 1856. Was with the regiment In the Crimea after the fall of Sebastopol ; .served during the Indian Mutiny, including the relief of Lucknow by Lord Clyde, operations at Cawnpore and battle of the 6th of December, 1857; pursuit to Serai Ghat ; passage of the Kala Nuddee and occupation of Futtehgurh ; siege and capture of Lucknow; Rohilcund campaign to the capture of Bareilly ; campaign In Oude, including actions of Pusgaon, Russulpore, and capture of Fort Mittowlie. Retired in 1865. He has the Indian medal with two clasps.’

Army list entry additionally notes ‘Affair of Bunnee, defeat of Gwalior contingent at Cawnpore’.

The 93rd remained in India after the Mutiny and in 1862 suffered greatly during a cholera epidemic. In mid 1863, the Regiment, now down to just over 500 Officers and men, was again was called on for active service on the Peshwar Frontier. For his services during the Eusofzaie campaign, Greig would be awarded the Indian General Service medal with the clasp ‘Umbeyla’. However on 4 July 1865, Grieg retired from the Army.

The following website gives a very good résumé of the 93rd’s service:
http://www.theargylls.co.uk/service93rd.php

It seems Greig stayed in India after retiring from the Army, for he was appointed to the Forestry Department, Bengal in late 1868:
‘ Captain Greig, formerly of her Majesty's 93rd Highlanders, has obtained an appointment in the Forest Department, and will, in all probability, be appointed Assistant Conservator in the Dhoon. ‘

Its not clear how long he stayed in India, however a snippet of Greig’s later life can be found in ‘Letters Written During a Trip to Southern India & Ceylon in the Winter 1876-77’ by C.R. Williams.

Here the author talks of meeting Captain Greig, his wife and sister on their way to India on the S.S. Nepaul in October 1876. Greig was returning from leave and on his return would be promoted Officiating Conservator of Forests in the North West Province, a position he was still holding until at least 1885;
“..There is one man on board, who sits next to me at meals, and whose occupation a youngster might well envy. He is Captain Greig, formerly in the 92nd Highlanders, and now one of the Conservators of Forests for the North Western Provinces. He spends the largest part of each year in tents, moving about through and by the side of the forests which extend at the base of and parallel with the Himalayas, directing the cutting and planting of trees and the management of the forests. This is another name, in fact, for perpetual sport. His entire camp equipage is found for him, including two elephants, on which animal alone he is able to penetrate the dense jungle through which he has sometimes to pass- fie said to me yesterday, "Why can't you leave your brother for a fortnight, and come and pay me a visit? You will see life with me, and sport such as very few men who have been in India all their lives have seen. I'll send the elephants down to meet you at" (naming the place), "if you will only write to me a few days beforehand and fix the day…"

Its not clear where the rank of Captain came from, though he may well have had some Militia service or such post 1865. Captain Greig died back in Great Britain on 14 June 1919, aged 81.

One of approximately 10 Officers Mutiny medal recorded as extent, including Surgeon, Chaplain and QM, thus a very scarce pair of medals.

Condition NEF. Ex DNW 1999. Sold with copied research, including; letter from his father regarding his Commission, LG’s, Army lists, medal rolls, copy 93rd photo and a regimental history on CD.

Code J2437        Price £