medal code j2522

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THE OUTSTANDING MGS 1793 AND WATERLOO PAIR TO COLONEL CHARLES WOOD WHO AS A YOUNG ENSIGN OF THE 52ND LIGHT INFANTRY WAS WOUNDED AT THE BATTLE OF BUSACO WHILST CARRY THE KING’S COLOURS OF THE REGIMENT SERVED AS ADC TO MAJ GENERAL ‘BLACK BOB’ CRAUFURD AND WAS WITH HIM WHEN HE WAS KILLED AT CIUDAD RODRIGO, NEXT SERVING ON WELLINGTON’S STAFF, BEFORE SERVING AS ADC TO LORD STEWART DURING HIS MISSION TO GERMANY IN 1813. HE THERE SERVED WITH BOTH THE RUSSIAN COSSACKS AND THE PRUSSIAN ARMY DURING THE GREAT BATTLES OF 1813-14, INCLUDING THE GREAT BATTLE OF LEIPZIG BEING ONE OF THE HANDFUL OF BRITISH SOLDIERS PRESENT THERE AND AT THE ALLIED ARMIES VICTORIOUS ENTRY INTO PARIS IN 1814. FOR HIS GALLANTRY HE WAS AWARDED THE PRUSSIAN ORDER OF MERIT (LATER KNOWN AS THE BLUE MAX), ONE OF JUST FOUR BRITISH OFFICERS EVER TO BE AWARDED THIS HIGHEST OF AWARDS. AS A CAPTAIN OF THE 10TH HUSSARS, HE SERVED IN THE WATERLOO CAMPAIGN AND ON 17TH JUNE 1815, WHEN IN COMMAND OF A PIQUET, HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR BRINGING THE NEWS TO WELLINGTON OF THE OF THE DEFEAT OF THE PRUSSIANS AT LINGY AND WAS WOUNDED AT THE HEAD OF HIS TROOP AT THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO

MILITARY GENERAL SERVICE 1793, FIVE CLASPS, BUSACO, FUENTES D’ONOR, CIUDAD RODRIGO, BADAJOZ AND SALAMANCA, ‘C. WOOD, SUBT, 52ND FOOT, ADC & DAAG’, WATERLOO MEDAL 1815, WITH REPLACEMENT CLIP AND STRAIGHT BAR SUSPENDER ‘CAPT CHARLES WOOD, 10TH ROYAL REGT OF HUSSARS’, ILVER MEDALLION (2” IN SIZE) NAMED TO COLONEL WOOD MP, LITTLETON, MIDDLESEX 1841 FOR JOHN CHARLES EARL SPENCER PRESIDENT ON OBVERSE.

Born in December 1790, the brother of Colonel Thomas Wood MP and nephew of the Marquis of Londonderry, He was expelled from Charterhouse school for starting a riot and immediately joined the Army in 1809.

FROM THE HISTORY OF THE 10TH HUSSARS

‘LIEUTENANT-COLONEL CHARLES WOOD was gazetted to the 52nd Light Infantry on the 16th March 1809. He proceeded at once to Portugal and joined his regiment at Ruxillo, as the army was falling back after the battle of Talavera. He served throughout the following campaign with the Light division, was present at the battle of Coa, and was wounded when carrying the King’s colour of the 52nd at Busaco. He was present at the battle of Fuentes d’Onore. In 1811 he was A. D. C. to General Robert Craufurd, and was with him At his death at the storming of Ciudad Rodrigo. He was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General at the Headquarters of the Duke of Wellington, and was present at the capture of Badajos, the battle of Salamanca, and the siege of Burgos. On the 17th September 1812, he was promoted a captain in the 68th Foot. In 1813 Captain Wood accompanied Lord Stewart to Germany as A. D. C. and afterwards took part with the Prussians in the campaign against the French. He was present at the battles of Gross-Beeren, Donnewitz, Wittemberg, and Leipsic, when the French, under Napoleon were totally defeated by the Allies. On this occasion, for his report on the evening of the 18th October that the French were retiring, and for saving a Prussian General and his staff from being capture, he was decorated by the King of Prussia with the military order of merit. After this victory he was present at all the subsequent engagements in France, and finally entered Paris in 1814. In July 1813 he had been posted to the 18th Hussars but he did not join them, and was transferred to the 10th Hussars in November 1814. He proceeded with his regiment to Belgium in 1815 and took part in the Waterloo campaign. When in command of a piquet on the 17th June he was one of the first to discover the retreat of the Prussians from Ligny, and he immediately reported this circumstance to the Duke of Wellington. He was severely wounded at the head of his troop on the 18th at Waterloo.

After the peace he was appointed brigadier-major on the staff at the Northern district, Pontefract. Colonel Charles Wood to the end of his life displayed an unabated interest in his old regiment. He made several presents to the officers’ mess, which are still much valued. Among them are pictures of old officers and uniforms, the Wellington Despatches, the Life of Ziethen, and other interesting books. He died on the 13th December 1877, at the age of eighty-seven.’

Condition, minor contact wear and small edge bruise to first two otherwise GVF, original shortened ribbons. A superb and incredibly rare group to an Officer with a quite outstanding service.

Research sold with medals includes; a copy of a Letter from Charles to his brother to Col. Thomas Wood, M.P. dated May 1813, from ‘Headquarters, Royal Cossacks, Voude, between Gramont and Nonove’ ain a file of research. Also, a large amount of research on CD; copy medal rolls, PDF books (in addition to those noted above), LG’s, copy newspapers obituary, regimental and campaign histories etc etc. Although a good deal has been found on Wood, the potential for more research is vast.

Code J2522        Price £