medal code J2843

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A SUDAN, BOER AND GREAT WAR GROUP AWARDED TO THE CAPTAIN COMMANDING ‘B’ COMPANY, 1ST CAMERON HIGHLANDERS WHO AFTER BEING WOUNDED WAS REPORTEDLY MURDERED BY GERMAN TROOPS AT THE BATTLE FOR TROYON RIDGE, DURING THE BATTLE OF THE AISNE 14 SEPTEMBER 1914 A BATTLE IN WHICH THE BATTALION SUSTAINED AN HORRENDOUS NUMBER OF CASUALTIES

QUEEN’S SUDAN MEDAL 1897-8 ‘2/LT. A. HORNE. 1/CAM: HRS:’, QUEEN’S SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL 1899-1902, CLASPS: CAPE COLONY, ORANGE FREE STATE, TRANSVAAL ‘LIEUT. A. HORNE. 1/CAMN. HIGHRS.’, KING’S SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL 1901-1902, 2 CLASPS: SOUTH AFRICA 1901, SOUTH AFRICA 1902, naming erased, 1914 STAR WITH CLASP ‘CAPT: A. HORNE. CAM’N: HIGHRS’ BRITISH WAR MEDAL AND VICTORY MEDAL’ CAPT. A. HORNE.’, KHEDIVE’S SUDAN MEDAL 1896-1908, 2 CLASPS: THE ATBARA, KHARTOUM, unnamed as issued.

Alexander Horne was born on 30th September 1875 in Edinburgh, Scotland, the fourth son of Thomas Elliot Ogilvie Horne, a writer to the Signet. The Society of Writers to Her Majesty's Signet is a private society of Scottish solicitors, dating back to 1594 and part of the College of Justice. He was also first cousin to Major General H.S. Horne, Royal Horse Artillery, and of Lieutenant Colonel E.W. Horne, 3rd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders. Educated at Saint Ninian’s Preparatory School at Moffat and then at Charterhouse School in Surrey, he originally entered the British Army Militia before obtaining his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant with the Seaforth Highlanders in 1897, and being posted to the 1st Battalion.

Horne saw service in Egypt and took part in the reconquest of the Sudan, being present at the Battle of The Atbara on 9th April 1898, and then the Battle of Omdurman and the entry into Khartoum on 3rd September 1898. With the capture of Khartoum, Horne was then sent to Fashoda with his company acting as escort to Lord Kitchener, the Commander-in-Chief in the Sudan.

With the outbreak of the Boer War, Horne, by then promoted to Lieutenant, went on to see service in South Africa and was present on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, as well as operating on the Zululand frontier of Natal. Horne was a keen huntsman with hounds, and in 1906 won the Irish Army Point-to-Point race for heavyweights and also ran third for lightweights. He was also a member of both the Automobile and Caledonian Clubs in London.

Having been promoted to Captain, at the outbreak of the Great War, Horne, who was then Commander of ‘B’ Company, 1st Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, served with the B.E.F. on the Western Front from 14 August 1914. Taking part in the early actions of the War, including the retreat from Mons, Captain Horne was reportedly murdered by German troops after being wounded at Troyon Ridge, during the Battle of the Aisne. During the battle, in which the Cameron’s lost 600 Officers and men, Horne was shot through both legs and carried to a ditch slightly in the rear of the firing line. However with the Regiment coming under ‘murderous shrapnel fire’, the battalion was forced to retreat, leaving Captain Horne under care of a sergeant and two Red Cross men. Exactly what happened next is unknown but reports from survivors of the battalion tell that the men with Horne made a Red Cross flag out of a handkerchief and Horne’s blood and hoisted it before the advancing Germans but on the Cameron’s advancing again to retake their old position, they found captain Horne with his head knocked in by rifle butts and shot with his own revolver. The following newspapers reported:…………..

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Condition: third with erased naming, otherwise Good Very Fine or better. The clasp and roses to his 1914 Star were claimed in November 1920. Sold with copy obituaries, medal rolls and reports of his murder by the German’s (on CD).

Code J2843        Price £