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SUPERB FRENCH NAPOLEONIC WARS VETERANS ST HELENE MEDAL GROUP TO A FUSILIER WHO SERVED IN THE PENINSULAR WITH THE 105TH LINE REGIMENT AND AT WATERLOO WHERE THE REGIMENTS EAGLE WAS CAPTURED BY THE 1ST ROYAL DRAGOONS DURING THE CHARGE OF THE UNION BRIGADE!

Created in 1857 by Napoleon III for issue to surviving soldiers of Napoleon Bonaparte's Grande Armée (French, Belgiums, Dutch, Danish, Irish, etc..) who had served between 1792 and 1815.

The document is named ‘Lallemand,Claude, Soldat au 105è de ligne’ and numbered; ‘172432’. Document in old frame, bit of age foxing to document but no damage

The medal obverse shows the bust of Emperor Napoleon I. The reverse inscribed ‘Campagnes de 1792 a 1815. Medal with nice original ribbon which looks to have been worn, ribbon having an old pin in it

Claude Lallemand from Ville sous la Ferté was born on 2nd March 1794 and served in Napoleon’s Grande Armée as a Fusilier in 105ème de ligne from 9th May 1813. The 105th Line Infantry had a long and illustrious history fighting in many of the most well known battles of the Napoleonic Wars. Lallemand joining in May 1813 would have seen service in the later stages of the Peninsular War, the 105th serving at Pampelune, Roncal, Jaca, Bidassoa, and Bayonne and in Germany etc in 1814; Hambourg, Bar-sur-Aube, and Arcis-sur-Aube. In 1815 the 105th would fight at Waterloo. Here they lost their Eagle to the 1st Royal Dragoons during the Charghe of the Union Brigade, one of just two Eagles lost by French Regiments at the battle. The Eagle is now held in the National Army Museum and was one of the most treasured trophies of the battle.

Lallemand left the service on 21st July 1821, so was one of the soldiers that entered the Royal Army after Napoleon’s abdication in 1815.

CAPTURE OF THE FRENCH EAGLE AT WATERLOO

‘The 105th formed part of the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, of the French I Corps, which was charged by the British 1st (Royal) and 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons. Captain Alexander Clark led his squadron of the Royals around the French flank, but then caught sight of the eagle and made a dash at it. He later told how he ran the eagle bearer through the right side above the hip, and then again through the body, but was unable to grab the standard, which fell across the horse of Corporal F. Stiles. Clark then sent Stiles to the rear with the Eagle.’

A scarce Award document and medal relating to a very famous event during the battle of Waterloo.

Code J1725        Price £575