medal code J2591

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A FINE CRIMEA 1854 TO A PRIVATE OF THE 47TH FOOT WHO WAS AWARDED THE DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL, PROBABLY FOR THE BATTLE OF ALMA OR INKERMANN BUT WAS LATER KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE ASSAULT ON THE QUARRIES ON THE 7 JUNE 1855

CRIMEA 1854, CLASPS, ALMA, INKERMANN ‘T. COOK. 47TH REGT.’

Thomas Cook, a 19 year old labourer from Atherstone, Warwickshire, enlisted into the 47th Foot on 17 August 1841. After spending 18 months with the Regimental Depot in Ireland, he embarked for service in Antigua, remaining there until November 1843 when he returned to Ireland. Spending the rest of the 1840’s on Home Service, Cook lost pay on a number of instances for being absent without leave and spent 40 days at the Provost Prison in Ireland for an unknown and clearly more serious offense. In the early 1850’s, he served in Corfu and was hospitalised in Malta, before rejoining his Regiment in Turkey in May 1854 and then on to the Crimea.

Private Cook took part in the great battles of Alma and Inkerman, being recommended for the award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 31 January 1855. Cook’s award was one of the first batch to be awarded and 10 other D.C.M.’s were recommended to men of the 47th on this date. Interestingly, though the other 10 men are noted as having been issued their medal on 26 March 1855, Cook’s was not issued until 3 May 1855. Circumstances of the award are not known, though it is likely it was for the battles of Alma, Inkerman or quite possibly for the magnificent defensive action fought by the 47th piquet against overwhelming odd on the 26 October 1854; often known as ‘Little Inkerman’.

Cook served in the trenches before Sebastopol over the winter of 1854-55 but was killed in action on the 7 June 1855 during the successful assault on the Quarries. The 47th lost heavily during this battle, loosing 81 Officers and Men, killed or wounded.

Cook’s name also appears on a supplementary roll for the clasp ‘Sebastopol’ which would have been issued loose separately and therefore not attached to the medal. Looking at prior sales of 47th Crimea medals, this seems to be quite common as the supplementary roll is quite large.

Condition VF officially impressed naming, with attractive ribbon brooch (missing split pin). Minor contact wear around 7/8 o’clock suggests Cook’s medal had been sometime worn with his D.C.M. Sold with copy rolls, musters and other research.

A very fine medal and unusual to have so much biographical detail for a soldier who was killed in action.

Code J2591        Price £